Avoid the scare, be prepared

SARAH HARTMAN | Evergreen columnist

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It takes just two agonizing minutes, while pacing back and forth after peeing on a stick, to picture your life as a mother: sleepless nights, dirty diapers, and constant crying – not just the baby’s. Let’s be real, ladies. At some point many of us have thought we were pregnant, and in those panicked moments we turned to pregnancy tests.

But ladies aren’t the only ones who freak out in these circumstances. A man, too, might envision his future trying to support a family if you tell him you’re a week late on your period. We fail to fully grasp what would happen if that blue line weren’t lying.

I believe most college students ought to care for themselves without the added pressure of supporting another life. My friend from high school just recently had her baby, and as a result her focus has shifted drastically. I worry that in cases like this women lose sight of their dreams to make room for their children.

About a third of American females becomes pregnant before the age of 20, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All it takes is one slip-up – literally – so here’s how I avoid becoming part of that statistic.

First, don’t ever fall for the classic ‘let’s just get naked and cuddle.’ It’s pretty clear where that will lead. The same goes for back massages. Even harmless intentions can lead to happy endings. Finally, we all know showering together ‘to save water’ is not an attempt to go green.

With all this in mind, here are some more concrete forms of birth control.

Needless to say, abstinence is the only 100-percent-effective way to avoid getting pregnant. It’s as simple as saying ‘no.’ For many, however, ‘yes’ might be a more appealing answer.

While ‘no glove, no love” is a motto that many college students should live by, Planned Parenthood has reported that condoms are only 85 percent effective.

The pill is my favorite form of birth control because it minimizes acne and might even make your boobs grow about a cup size. Hence, no more bombshell bras – seriously, why are those a thing?

It’s hard to remember when to take the pill, so do what I do and set an alarm for 11:11. It reminds me that the last thing I would wish for is to get pregnant.

According to a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, teenage pregnancy rates have been in decline. Let’s avoid following in Bristol Palin’s footsteps and use contraception to control our bodies and our futures.