The Daily Evergreen

Adviser loves to see students succeed

SARAH OLSEN | Evergreen news editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This year’s best WSU adviser said she came into her position as an academic and career adviser in order to help low-income, high-achieving students earn their bachelor’s degrees.

Sharon Ericsson currently serves as the assistant director of the Academic Success and Career Center.

“I feel like I have the best job on campus,” Ericsson said.

For her, winning best adviser means students feel listened to, supported and cared for.

One of the highlights of her career at WSU has been creating a study abroad program for first-generation students. She currently teaches a class about preparing for this program.

On a daily basis, Ericsson advises students by helping them plan out their majors, internships and jobs. She also plans out teaching courses for the center and her first-generation student study abroad program preparation class, she said.

“I’m surprised, I’m humbled, I’m honored,” Ericsson said. “It’s always my pleasure to serve the students.”

What has kept her at WSU, besides Cougar pride, is the students themselves, she said.

“The students have been really just so wonderful,” Ericsson said. “They’re really great and ambitious, eager to get involved and lead other students.”

Seeing the students get amazing internships and jobs after graduation is a huge highlight of her job, she said.

“I love helping students grow into skilled professionals,” Ericsson said.

She said she is always trying to make sure students know about all the academic support and resources available in the center.

“I love helping students dream big and develop plans to achieve their goals,” Ericsson said.

She said she is in the process of putting together a career exploration program for the summer of 2018 in Prague.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






No P.R. No B.S. No Retreat. Watchdogs since 1895
Adviser loves to see students succeed