Commission revises zoning classification

Members decide rules about ice and snow removal in different parts of Pullman

The+commission+is+considering+36%2C620+square+feet+of+land+at+50+NW+Terre+View+Drive+in+the+plan+and+classification.+The+land+will+not+be+reclassified+and+will+remain+a+residential+area.
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Commission revises zoning classification

The commission is considering 36,620 square feet of land at 50 NW Terre View Drive in the plan and classification. The land will not be reclassified and will remain a residential area.

The commission is considering 36,620 square feet of land at 50 NW Terre View Drive in the plan and classification. The land will not be reclassified and will remain a residential area.

ANDREA GONZALEZ

The commission is considering 36,620 square feet of land at 50 NW Terre View Drive in the plan and classification. The land will not be reclassified and will remain a residential area.

ANDREA GONZALEZ

ANDREA GONZALEZ

The commission is considering 36,620 square feet of land at 50 NW Terre View Drive in the plan and classification. The land will not be reclassified and will remain a residential area.

ANDREA GONZALEZ, Evergreen reporter

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The City of Pullman Planning Commission held public hearings to revise zoning classifications and to amend the comprehensive plan map designations.

The commission is considering 36,620 square feet of land at 50 NW Terre View Drive in the plan and classification.

The commission recommended the land should not become a commercial area which would mean an increase in the amount of businesses present. The land is currently a low-density residential area which means it is being used as for housing.

The commission also considered 18.2 acres of land which is located around the southwest intersection of SE Clearwater Drive and SE Bypass Drive.

The commission recommended that Pullman City Council should not reclassify the zoning for the land. The land will remain classified as C3 general commercial which means the land will still be used for businesses and stores.

The city’s draft for the Complete Streets Policy was also discussed.

Kevin Gardes, City of Pullman public works director, said the draft is a public works initiative.

Gardes said the Complete Streets Policy makes roadways available to all modes of transportation.

The Department of Parks, Facilities & Recreation clears snow off streets that are owned by the city. The Pullman city code requires property owners to clear their own sidewalks, he said.

The Pullman Police Department enforces the code that requires property owners to clear their own sidewalk, Gardes said.

Bus stops, hospitals and schools are the primary routes that get cleared of snow, he said.

Once the primary routes are cleared from the snow then the other streets in Pullman are cleared, Gardes said.

He said there is a commission in charge of deciding which streets to clear. The commission consists of city staff such as city engineers and planning directors as well as maintenance and operations employees.

An attendee said they would like to have a committee consisting of residents so they can also have their input on the roads and sidewalks that get cleared.

Another attendee said it is important the sidewalks get cleared because college students put themselves at risk to go to school.

Gardes said the Complete Streets Policy will be taken to the Pullman City Council for discussion on Feb. 4.

The policy will be revised with city council’s ordinance and the public’s comment, he said. The revised policy will be adopted in early March by the city council.