Apothecary offers CBD, herbal tea, classes

A+wide+variety+of+loose+leaf+herbal+teas+including+lemon+ginger+are+displayed+on+a+shelf+at+Sam%E2%80%99s+Apothecary+at+250+E.+Main+Street+in+downtown+Pullman.+
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Apothecary offers CBD, herbal tea, classes

A wide variety of loose leaf herbal teas including lemon ginger are displayed on a shelf at Sam’s Apothecary at 250 E. Main Street in downtown Pullman.

A wide variety of loose leaf herbal teas including lemon ginger are displayed on a shelf at Sam’s Apothecary at 250 E. Main Street in downtown Pullman.

SERENA HOFDAHL

A wide variety of loose leaf herbal teas including lemon ginger are displayed on a shelf at Sam’s Apothecary at 250 E. Main Street in downtown Pullman.

SERENA HOFDAHL

SERENA HOFDAHL

A wide variety of loose leaf herbal teas including lemon ginger are displayed on a shelf at Sam’s Apothecary at 250 E. Main Street in downtown Pullman.

RACHEL KOCH, Evergreen reporter

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Since 2017, Sam’s Apothecary has provided the local area with a variety of natural products.

Owner Sam Brown opened Sam’s Apothecary shortly before Mom’s Weekend that year, he said.

 “It had been a dream for awhile,” Brown said. “Everything started to fall together in the fall of 2016, then I found a location here in Pullman.”

Sam’s Apothecary is an inclusive space that sells herbal tea blends, tarot cards and other similar products, he said.

“We really have something unique that we’re able to give to everyone,” Brown said.

The store also sells a diverse collection of cannabidiol products, such as lotions and oils, he said.

The conditions that CBD can be used to treat include but are not limited to mild pain, anxiety and insomnia, Brown said.

Brown recommends that students who shop at Sam’s Apothecary focus on finding products with the intention of relieving stress and anxiety, he said.

Sam’s Apothecary sells herbal blends used to make teas. They are stored in glass jars on a shelf in the back corner of the store and scooped out into smaller cans or bags for individual users.

Brown blends the teas himself, he said.

 “I do most things here intuitively,” Brown said. “I pick the herbs that I want … Then I put in how much feels good and then I write it down so that I have a recipe moving forward.”

Sam’s Apothecary receives much of its supply from Palouse Herbal Apothecary.

Co-owner Laura Gage started her business toward the end of 2017, she said.

 “It’s really always been my dream to work with herbs,” Gage said. “It’s been my mom’s dream as well.”

Gage and her mother, Rosemary Gage, own Palouse Herbal Apothecary together, she said.

 “My goal here is to provide sustainable, as-local-as-possible herbal medicine to practitioners and the community,” Gage said.

Gage has received training in several fields, such as Chinese medicine, acupuncture and western herbal medicine, she said.

 “I feel like I’m an ambassador for the herbs to humans,” Gage said. “I understand their language a little bit more than other people do.”

According to their website, Sam’s Apothecary offers classes located at the store. There are currently no details available about when the next class will be.

Brown teaches a class once a semester, he said.

The theme for the next class is called Loving Your Energy, Brown said.

 “They’re all great, depending on what you want to learn,” Gage said.

Gage also teaches classes located at Sam’s Apothecary, she said. Within the next six weeks, she will teach classes that focus on treating illnesses such as colds, types of flu and strengthening the immune system to prevent getting sick in the first place, she said.

Products that contain ingredients such as echinacea and astragalus can help prevent or treat the symptoms of colds and flu, she said.

 “I think that in general, the reason why holistic medicine is received so well is because we can spend time with people,” Gage said. “We can really hear their journey.”

Sam’s Apothecary is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday on 250 E. Main St.