The Daily Evergreen

WSU librarian compiles list of anti-racist resources

The anti-racist resource guide is available online at WSU Libraries. The guide includes a list of books about race and racism.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

July 22, 2020

A WSU librarian created a resource guide of books to encourage conversation about race and racism. After the murder of George Floyd, there was a lot of self examination, both for individuals and for institutions, WSU Libraries librarian Erica Nicol said. The anti-racist resources guide was create...

Bats must be studied more to understand transmission of viruses, researchers say

Scientists do not fully understand how bats have so many viruses that can spill over to humans, a WSU researcher says. When humans contract a virus from bats, it can cause disease and death.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

July 20, 2020

In a literature review, WSU researchers determined bats must be studied more. This is because scientists do not know enough about how to lessen the threats they pose to human health.  When bat viruses jump to another species, they tend to be highly pathogenic, said Stephanie Seifert, assistant p...

Bacterial compound may treat entire class of parasites

Roberta O’Connor, associate professor in WSU’s Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, extracts shipworms from wood in the Philippines. Shipworms contain bacteria that produce useful compounds for drugs.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

July 3, 2020

A compound produced by bacteria in shipworms may help WSU researchers create a drug treatment for a class of parasites called apicomplexans.  “This is the only drug we know of that targets this whole class of parasites,” said Roberta O’Connor, associate professor in WSU’s Department of Veter...

Environment, neighborhood characteristics affect people’s longevity, researchers say

Walkability is correlated to a person’s likelihood of living to 100 years old, according to a study conducted by WSU researchers.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

July 1, 2020

Factors such as neighborhood walkability and socioeconomic status are correlated to a person’s likelihood of living to 100 years old, according to a study conducted by WSU researchers.  It is more likely for people to live to 100 years old if they are female, white or live in areas where there is a higher perce...

Plant protein may help researchers understand drought resilience

Hollow cells in the xylem have pits that allow water to move from roots to shoots. MAP20 is a protein that helps regulate pit architecture.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

June 29, 2020

By knocking down the concentration of a protein called MAP20 in plant cells, WSU researchers determined cells with less MAP20 are less likely to recover from drought, providing insight into the function of the protein. The research delves into the vascular system of plants, which is relatively unknown...

WSU researchers receive grant for new computing system design

Researchers from WSU’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Duke University are utilizing 3D chips to develop a new computing framework.

BRADLEY GAMBLE, Evergreen reporter

June 26, 2020

The National Science Foundation gave WSU and Duke University researchers a three-year grant to develop a new computing framework, which will use 3D chips to increase the efficiency of computing and communication.  Partha Pratim Pande, director of WSU’s School of Electrical Engineering and Comput...

Employment of certain groups more likely to be affected by pandemic, study says

A study examining unemployment during COVID-19 found that women with children, people with disabilities, as well as certain racial and ethnic groups were more likely to lose employment or experience a decrease in hours.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

June 24, 2020

A WSU associate professor interested in the effects of the pandemic and resulting recession authored a paper on groups of people whose employment is more likely to be affected during COVID-19.  Ben Cowan, associate professor for the WSU School of Economic Sciences, conducted a study that found peop...

WSU researchers test environmental samples for coronavirus genetic material

Humans and other animals shed coronavirus particles when they are infected. These particles are spread throughout the shedder's environment.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

June 22, 2020

Testing environmental samples for pieces of RNA, the single-stranded genetic material of coronaviruses, may help WSU researchers determine how long the virus can persist outside a host.  Researchers will collect samples of wastewater, soil and stormwater from both urban and rural areas in Washington and ...

Five bacterial proteins could be used for vaccine in cattle

Some cattle, especially younger ones, seem to better withstand infection from a disease called anaplasmosis.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

June 22, 2020

WSU researchers investigating the bacteria Anaplasma marginale have identified five proteins that could potentially be used in a global vaccine against it. A. marginale is a tick-borne bacteria that infects red blood cells in cattle, said Kelly Brayton, professor in WSU’s Department of Veterinary Micro...

Survey finds pandemic strengthens bonds between humans, pets

Survey participants reported looking forward to spending time with their pets each day. No one reported taking care of a pet felt like extra work.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

June 17, 2020

Humans are relying more on their pets for companionship, hope and a sense of purpose during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to recent surveys about human-animal interactions. A team of five researchers, including Phyllis Erdman, executive associate dean of WSU’s College of Education, surveyed ove...

Science Explained: How do allergies work?

People who are exposed to more parasites in their childhood will likely have a lower chance of suffering from allergies. This is called hygiene hypothesis.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

June 15, 2020

Seasonal-allergy sufferers are all familiar with the classic symptoms of watery eyes, runny nose and congestion that come with allergies. The scientific cause for allergic reactions may actually lie in a defense against parasites, said Phil Mixter, clinical associate professor in WSU's School of Mole...

Wording of vaccine ads matter, WSU alumna says

Porismita Borah, associate professor of strategic communications in WSU's Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, helped with a study on usage of certain language in ads.

BRADLEY GAMBLE, Evergreen reporter

June 15, 2020

Words matter for any organization trying to reach an audience. The same goes for vaccine ads, according to a new WSU study. A recent WSU alumna and an associate professor conducted the first experimental study on how social normative messages in vaccine ads affect consumer behavior.  Xizhu Xiao, stra...

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