Speakers discuss advocacy, Indigenous Peoples’ Day

WSU professor says nonprofit offers free, confidential services

Daniela+Miranda%2C+Region+8+Crime+Victim+Advocate%2C+addresses+GPSA+Senators+about+resources+available+for+assault+victims+on+Monday+evening+in+the+CUB.
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Speakers discuss advocacy, Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Daniela Miranda, Region 8 Crime Victim Advocate, addresses GPSA Senators about resources available for assault victims on Monday evening in the CUB.

Daniela Miranda, Region 8 Crime Victim Advocate, addresses GPSA Senators about resources available for assault victims on Monday evening in the CUB.

TIMOTHY FAIRBANKS-CLOUSER

Daniela Miranda, Region 8 Crime Victim Advocate, addresses GPSA Senators about resources available for assault victims on Monday evening in the CUB.

TIMOTHY FAIRBANKS-CLOUSER

TIMOTHY FAIRBANKS-CLOUSER

Daniela Miranda, Region 8 Crime Victim Advocate, addresses GPSA Senators about resources available for assault victims on Monday evening in the CUB.

KAITLYN TEJERO, Evergreen reporter

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Daniela Miranda, an advocate at the Crime Victim Service Center at Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, spoke to GPSA Monday about service the organization offers that students can access.

Miranda, who works for the crime victim services unit at ATVP, said the nonprofit provides free and confidential services and advocacy for survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence.

“We do not discriminate based on anything. There is no criteria that we would ever use to turn anyone away,” Miranda said. “That being said, we only work with victims.”

She said crime victim services can provide emergency financial assistance for people to be able to move forward after they experience a crime.

“We can provide actual financial assistance to cover rent and go with victims to the hospital,” Miranda said.

She said that often when people hear the term “crime services” they ask if it is affiliated to the police.

Miranda said she wants students to be aware that they are in no way affiliated.

“What this means is we still have a really good relationship with the WSU police department and Pullman police department, but you do not have to report to the police to use our services,” she said.

Jeremiah Sataraka, WSU teaching assistant, spoke to the senate about the second annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Sataraka said last year WSU voted to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day in place of Columbus Day.

“It is an acknowledgment that Columbus wasn’t the one to discover the new world,” he said. “There was already a bunch of people who lived here who’s cultures we should recognize.”

Sataraka said events will take place throughout the day on campus, starting at 8:15 am. On Oct. 14.

“There will be a main event at noon on the mall,” he said. “There will be some guest speakers to talk about indigenous people.”

Editors note: This story was edited to correct Miranda’s title and amend one of her quotes.