Speaker talks assault prevention

Other speakers promoted hospital bond appearing on upcoming ballot

Sarah+Boyer%2C+member+of+Alternatives+to+Violence+of+the+Palouse%2C+says+violence+prevention+is+a+way+to+promote+healthy+and+safe+communities+Tuesday+evening+at+the+Pullman+City+Hall.
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Speaker talks assault prevention

Sarah Boyer, member of Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, says violence prevention is a way to promote healthy and safe communities Tuesday evening at the Pullman City Hall.

Sarah Boyer, member of Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, says violence prevention is a way to promote healthy and safe communities Tuesday evening at the Pullman City Hall.

CAROLYNN CLAREY

Sarah Boyer, member of Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, says violence prevention is a way to promote healthy and safe communities Tuesday evening at the Pullman City Hall.

CAROLYNN CLAREY

CAROLYNN CLAREY

Sarah Boyer, member of Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse, says violence prevention is a way to promote healthy and safe communities Tuesday evening at the Pullman City Hall.

BENJAMIN WHITE, Evergreen reporter

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The Pullman City Council heard presentations regarding Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the upcoming Pullman Regional Hospital bond at the city council meeting Tuesday.

“We see that violence prevention is absolutely the way forward to provide for healthy communities and safe communities for everyone living in them. To that end, we now often refer to domestic violence awareness month additionally to domestic violence action month,” said Sarah Boyer, Alternatives to Violence of the Palouse member.

Chelsea Jacobs, prevention educator and advocate for ATVP, brought the Palouse Team Council, a high school student group that gives workshops throughout the community.

Jacobs also thanked the city and partners for their efforts to prevent domestic violence and help victims.

“[I] proclaim October as domestic violence awareness month for the City of Pullman and urge all residents to give up being bystanders and speak up at any time against domestic violence,” Mayor Glenn Johnson said.

CAROLYNN CLAREY
Mayor Glenn Johnson discusses the impact the new portable stage has on the community on Tuesday night at Pullman City Hall. Mike Urban, Pullman finance and administration services director, said the stage would cost approximately $158,000.

Scott Adams, CEO of Pullman Regional Hospital, and Jeff Elbracht, director of facilities and finance for WSU University Recreation, gave a joint presentation on the New Era of Excellence bond, which is on the upcoming ballot.

Elbracht said the two focuses of the bond are the electronic medical record system and the 45,000 square feet of new land for outpatient services.

Adams said the cost to property owners would be 99 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. He said similar to the current bond that is near retirement, the amount taxed will likely decrease as property values increase in Pullman.

Mike Urban, Pullman finance and administration services director, said the city council should accept a bid from Century Industries LLC to build a portable stage that can be used at events like the Fourth of July or Lentil Festivals.

He previously suggested they decline a bid from Century Industries LLC because it was beyond the funds available for the project, he said. However, after they declined and put out a second bid, the same company was the only one that responded.

He said the portable stage will cost approximately $158,000 and he is doing what he can to save money with things like having the company deliver the stage.

City attorney Laura McAloon prepared a memo for councilmembers that explained what powers the city has over nuisance regulation.

Councilmember Eileen MacColl said the city should address residents’ concerns with downtown business nuisances, which include unsightliness.

Several councilmembers expressed interest in making new regulations for nuisances and said they needed time to read the memo and make informed decisions.