The student voice of Washington State University since 1895

The Daily Evergreen

The student voice of Washington State University since 1895

The Daily Evergreen

The student voice of Washington State University since 1895

The Daily Evergreen

This image, which appears in the study manuscript, shows the physical differences between freshwater and toxin-adapted Atlantic molly. Toxin-adapted fish have larger heads and gills as adaptations to the oxygen-deficient water.

Study finds epigenetic modifications last multiple generations in toxin-adapted fish

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen news editor July 1, 2021

WSU researchers found in a study that epigenetic modifications for fish living in toxic hydrogen sulfide-rich water can last for two generations after being moved to fresh water.  DNA itself — through...

Researchers studied multiple springs in Teapa, Mexico, with different levels of hydrogen sulfide and saw the stages of the fish adapting to the ecosystems.

Certain fish found to adapt to toxic water

SYDNEY OPFER, Evergreen reporter March 17, 2021

Fish can adapt to living in water with deadly levels of hydrogen sulfide, researchers found. These Poeciliid fish that the researchers studied are found in four different springs in southern Mexico....

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