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Club supports students’ transition into career

Guest speakers in nutrition field often speak at club meetings

Pre-Nutrition+and+Exercise+Physiology+Club+Vice+President+Julia+McMaster+describes+the+activities+and+speakers+the+club+hosts.
Pre-Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Club Vice President Julia McMaster describes the activities and speakers the club hosts.

Pre-Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Club Vice President Julia McMaster describes the activities and speakers the club hosts.

ABBY LINNENKOHL | The Daily Evergreen

ABBY LINNENKOHL | The Daily Evergreen

Pre-Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Club Vice President Julia McMaster describes the activities and speakers the club hosts.

NINA WILLIS, Evergreen reporter

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The different speakers who come to most Pre-Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Club meetings offer volunteer and work experience to members while they go through their pre-nutrition studies.

The main goal of the club is to help nutrition and exercise physiology majors with applications, help them find internships and form study groups, Club President Alisha Currier said.

“I really like being able to help the other members,” Currier said. “They’ll ask me questions on how to get more involved. It’s awesome to help get a little further because applications usually require some job shadowing and volunteer hours.”

Last year, WSU Director of Sports Nutrition Lindsey Brown came to share her experience working in her field while offering a few volunteer positions to club members, Currier said.

Brown runs the Crimson Hub, which serves food to student athletes, Currier said. Some club members eventually went from volunteering to actual employment there.

Students gain a clear understanding of future careers in their major along with the volunteer experience offered during meetings, Vice President Julia McMaster said.

“Typically, we have a guest speaker at every meeting because it’s more informative,” McMaster said. “Alisha and I are just the president and vice president, so it’s not like we can give as much information. We don’t have our degrees yet.”

Becoming involved in the Pre-NEP Club has solidified McMaster’s choice in her major, she said.

“I’ve always been a very health-conscious person,” McMaster said. “My mom has always been tough on me to be healthy, and it’s always been a passion of mine. And I’m big on wanting to help people and this is a great way to do that.”

While club officers are still exploring new ideas, they often host drives and other fundraising and volunteering events, Currier said. This year, club members volunteered in the “Exercise is Medicine” event.

ABBY LINNENKOHL | The Daily Evergreen
Joe Astorino from the Community Action Center explains major diet
and nutrition problems faced by low-income people Tuesday in the CUE.

The officers are organizing a food drive with the Community Action Center, which will take place sometime just before winter break.

They would like to host a mini farmer’s market on campus sometime in the future, Currier said. The Moscow Food Co-op and a few other food-related businesses could join, and other clubs could set up booths as well, she said.

The nutrition and exercise physiology major involves going through the “2 + 2 program,” in which students spend the first two years at the Pullman campus before transferring to the campus in Spokane to complete their major, Currier said.

Students must fill out an application to transfer to the Spokane campus, McMaster said. They submit their applications in the winter in order to start in Spokane the next year.

In addition to hosting guest speakers at meetings, club members are encouraged to form study groups and act as a support system for each other throughout the program application process, Currier said.

WSU has more recently updated the nutrition and exercise physiology major to include more science-based class requirements, so a support system helps club members, Currier said.

The Pre-NEP Club began about four years ago, when the major was established at WSU, Currier said.

Those interested in learning more about the major should come to a meeting, McMaster said.

“Pre-health students could benefit from the volunteer or research experience in nutrition or even consider it as a minor,” Currier said. “I’ve heard a lot of nursing students like the idea of having nutrition as a minor.”

The Pre-NEP Club meets at 5:15 p.m. every other Monday in the CUE, Room 502. The next meeting is the Monday after Thanksgiving break. Those interested in joining can check out their Facebook and OrgSync pages. There is a $10 club fee for the entire school year.

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Club supports students’ transition into career