Neill’s Coffee and Ice Cream to replace Daily Grind on Main Street

New store modeled after old soda counters; expanded hours from Neill’s Flowers and Gifts

Neill%27s+Sweet+Shop+used+to+sell+flowers+and+ice+cream.+The+original+store+on+Main+Street+opened+100+years+ago.

COURTESY OF CHRIS CHANDLER

Neill's Sweet Shop used to sell flowers and ice cream. The original store on Main Street opened 100 years ago.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

The owners of Neill’s Flowers and Gifts will open Neill’s Coffee and Ice Cream, a new store modeled after old-fashioned soda counters, this summer at the location formerly occupied by Daily Grind on Main Street. 

Chris Chandler, special projects manager at Neill’s Flowers and Gifts, said they hope to open Neill’s Coffee and Ice Cream by mid-July. This will coincide with the 100th anniversary of Neill’s Main Street location, which opened in 1920.

The original store sold flowers as well as ice cream and was called Neill’s Sweet Shop, Chandler said.

“It’s always been in the business model of Neill’s to have some kind of confection,” he said. 

Neill’s Coffee and Ice Cream will have different hours than Neill’s Flowers and Gifts, Chandler said. It will be open earlier in the morning to serve coffee and later in the evening depending on demand. 

The full menu for Neill’s Coffee and Ice Cream is still being decided, he said. They plan to sell items with a similar theme to the old soda fountain, such as sundaes, banana splits, shakes and malts. The new store will also sell various coffee drinks.

Chandler said the new store will mainly focus on coffee and ice cream because they want to have a different market than Palouse Country Candy.

“We want to make sure [Palouse Country Candy] has a very viable business because we need all the businesses we can get,” he said. 

Pam Dabolt, owner of Palouse Country Candy, said her primary business is candy and even though she also sells gelato, the two stores will sell very different products.

“I’m thankful to have them opening those doors there,” Dabolt said. “I think anyone with a downtown business would have to agree, the more businesses we have, the better it is for everyone.”