‘Party in the Park’ celebrates culture, cuisine

Annual event run by International Students’ Council started in 1980s

Art+Club+members+Kira+Walters+and+Sidney+Westenskow+advertise+3D-printed+art+projects+and+hand-carved+tapes%C2%ACtries+from+art+students+during+the+International+Students%E2%80%99+Council+%E2%80%98Party+in+the+Park%E2%80%99+on+Saturday+at+Reaney+Park.
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‘Party in the Park’ celebrates culture, cuisine

Art Club members Kira Walters and Sidney Westenskow advertise 3D-printed art projects and hand-carved tapes¬tries from art students during the International Students’ Council ‘Party in the Park’ on Saturday at Reaney Park.

Art Club members Kira Walters and Sidney Westenskow advertise 3D-printed art projects and hand-carved tapes¬tries from art students during the International Students’ Council ‘Party in the Park’ on Saturday at Reaney Park.

EUGENE LEE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Art Club members Kira Walters and Sidney Westenskow advertise 3D-printed art projects and hand-carved tapes¬tries from art students during the International Students’ Council ‘Party in the Park’ on Saturday at Reaney Park.

EUGENE LEE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

EUGENE LEE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Art Club members Kira Walters and Sidney Westenskow advertise 3D-printed art projects and hand-carved tapes¬tries from art students during the International Students’ Council ‘Party in the Park’ on Saturday at Reaney Park.

ANGELICA RELENTE, Evergreen reporter

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The smell of Korean fried chicken filled the air at Reaney Park on Saturday. Event goers at the annual “Party in the Park,” hosted by the International Students’ Council, sat in front of the gazebo and watched an ‘Aparima performance, which combines hula and tongan dance, courtesy of Hawaii Club.

The event, which celebrated diversity and food from different cultures, has been held annually since the 1980s, said Shahd Al Harthi, WSU ISC public relations chair.

This was the first year the Indian Student Association participated in the event, ISA President Ruchira Tandel said. The dishes ISA offered included samosas, gulab jamun with ice cream and mango lassi.

Gulab jamun is a golden brown sweet ball, which is typically served as a dessert, Tandel said. Mango lassi, on the other hand, is a sweet drink made out of yogurt, milk, sugar and mango.

“We’re trying to do something to spread our organization,” Tandel said.

The food ISA prepared for Party in the Park are popular in India, she said. They were something people would eat throughout their childhood and adulthood alike.

Based on the popularity of meat dishes this year, Tandel said the ISA might provide more meat options in future events.

The Association of Bangladeshi Students and Scholars provided biriyani, which is a dish that consists of rice, chicken and vegetables. Spices are embedded in the rice and chicken, which gives the dish just enough heat, ABSS President Sabrina Ali said.

“It’s got a couple spices, but it shouldn’t be too spicy for people,” she said.

ABSS chose biriyani specifically because it is an uncommon dish that people cannot find in Pullman, Ali said. In future events, they hope to provide a variety of drinks and something similar to biriyani. They also hope to serve pakora, a bite-sized snack.

Ali said it was their first time in four years that they hosted a booth.

“I kind of wanted ABSS to be back as a mainstream organization,” she said.

There was more than just food at Party in the Park. The WSU Art Club and Pyromaniacs Clay Club also participated in the event.

Kira Walters, president of WSU Art Club, presented 3D printed art projects and hand-carved tapestries from art students. The 3D printed projects were created through Tinkercad, which allows students to print their art in 3D off of a computer, Walters said.

“As an art club, this is our first time selling as a gallery,” she said.

Krista Brand and Harry Mestyanek, officers of Pyromaniacs Clay Club, also showcased a variety of wheel-thrown and hand built bowls and mugs.

“Some things are functional,” Brand said. “Other things are more decorative.”

ISC hopes to continue the annual tradition and to expose people to different ethnic backgrounds, Al Harthi said.

“The aim of this event is to gather different international organizations,” she said. “To let everyone explore and see the different cultures and races that we have.”