The Daily Evergreen

Private prisons can cause longer prison sentences, study says

Private prisons are run by corporations that profit through stipends they receive from the government. The stipends are based on the size of the prison or the number of prisoners.

BROOKLYNN HILLEMANN, Evergreen reporter

September 28, 2020

WSU researchers found private prisons can contribute to mass incarceration with longer sentences for prisoners, according to a recently published article.  The first private prisons opened in the 1980s. They are run by corporations that profit through stipends they receive from the government, accordi...

Researchers test liquid hydrogen as potential green fuel source

Researchers used liquid hydrogen as a green fuel source for drones. Fueling the drone only requires a few gallons.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

September 28, 2020

A WSU lab is the first university lab in the country to successfully test liquid hydrogen as a green fuel source for unmanned aerial vehicles.  WSU researchers collaborated with Mississippi State University and Boeing subsidiary Insitu Inc. to create a hydrogen-electric version of the ScanEagle dro...

PETA asks state auditor to investigate WSU research with animals during COVID-19

PETA requested the Washington State Auditor’s Office to investigate whether WSU spent taxpayer dollars on experiments involving animals labeled as non-essential.

BRADLEY GAMBLE, Evergreen reporter

September 23, 2020

The animal rights organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals requested a state audit regarding WSU research involving animals labeled as “unnecessary.”  PETA requested the Washington State Auditor’s Office to investigate whether WSU spent taxpayer dollars on experiments invol...

Increased activity linked to more stress during early stages of pandemic, study finds

Conducting the study with twins let researchers account for the role of genetics or a shared environmental upbringing in changing stress levels.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

September 18, 2020

A recent survey by researchers at WSU Spokane found people who increased their exercise levels during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic experienced an increase in stress and anxiety. Increased exercise is usually linked to decreased stress levels, said lead author Glen Duncan, WSU professo...

Registration open for virtual hackathon

The 24-hour virtual Hack-a-House event will encourage university students to create ways to make housing more affordable nationwide.

BRADLEY GAMBLE, Evergreen reporter

September 14, 2020

WSU is co-sponsoring a 24-hour virtual Hack-a-House event where students can improve affordable housing in the U.S. by creating policies and design elements.  The event educates students about issues and concerns around affordable housing, said Ryan Smith, director of WSU’s School of Design and Con...

Data shows older citizens in rural areas receive fewer essential care services

Part of the reason for the research is to get policymakers to look at  location when considering essential services for older people.

SYDNEY BROWN, Evergreen reporter

September 11, 2020

Older citizens in rural areas are two and a half times less likely to receive essential care services than those living in metropolitan areas, according to a new study led in part by a WSU researcher.  Raven Weaver, WSU graduate human development researcher, said even when controlling for other fac...

New WSU research center in Kenya will provide diagnostic testing, vaccines

A researcher tests a camel for MERS-CoV in Marsabit, Kenya. Camels are known to be reservoir hosts of the virus.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

September 4, 2020

WSU launched a new Center for Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases in Nairobi, Kenya, which will speed the development of diagnostic testing and vaccines for various diseases in eastern and central Africa. As part of WSU’s Global Health - Kenya program, the center serves 13 countries in the r...

WSU student tests Styrofoam-eating mealworms as protein source

Mealworms that had a Styrofoam-only diet began to eat each other to get nutrients. Mealworms that ate Styrofoam and chicken appeared healthy.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

September 3, 2020

WSU master’s student Brenden Campbell began researching mealworms, a type of beetle larvae, for his Honors College thesis after he saw a Stanford research article showing mealworms can digest polystyrene, better known as Styrofoam. “My mind started spinning,” Campbell said. “If they can do...

WSU tree researchers attempt to prevent Little Cherry Disease

Scott Harper, WSU assistant professor of virology, examines diseased cherries, which can be small and bitter.

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

August 28, 2020

WSU scientists and cherry growers are finding new ways to prevent Little Cherry Disease, an infection that spreads between trees and can significantly decrease fruit yield.  When a tree growing fruit with pits, such as cherries or peaches, is infected with the disease, the only known way to keep i...

‘Cancel COVID’ campaign to educate about preventative practices

‘Cancel COVID’ campaign to educate about preventative practices

EMMA LEDBETTER, Evergreen reporter

August 13, 2020

WSU students may soon see more information about practices to reduce the spread of COVID-19 as part of a new system-wide “Cancel COVID” campaign.  Students who are interested in health communication, health promotion or spreading awareness about COVID-19 can apply to be Cancel COVID Champions online...

WSU librarian compiles list of anti-racist resources

The anti-racist resource guide is available online at WSU Libraries. The guide includes a list of books about race and racism.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

July 22, 2020

A WSU librarian created a resource guide of books to encourage conversation about race and racism. After the murder of George Floyd, there was a lot of self examination, both for individuals and for institutions, WSU Libraries librarian Erica Nicol said. The anti-racist resources guide was create...

Bats must be studied more to understand transmission of viruses, researchers say

Scientists do not fully understand how bats have so many viruses that can spill over to humans, a WSU researcher says. When humans contract a virus from bats, it can cause disease and death.

CHERYL AARNIO, Evergreen reporter

July 20, 2020

In a literature review, WSU researchers determined bats must be studied more. This is because scientists do not know enough about how to lessen the threats they pose to human health.  When bat viruses jump to another species, they tend to be highly pathogenic, said Stephanie Seifert, assistant p...

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