‘You don’t want to go alone’

‘Roamer’ resident volunteered at seasonal haunted house

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‘You don’t want to go alone’

COURTESY OF ERIC LOZ

COURTESY OF ERIC LOZ

COURTESY OF ERIC LOZ

RACHEL KOCH, Evergreen reporter

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For the two weekends leading up to Halloween, the volunteers at Haunted Palouse have worked to frighten visitors to the town of Palouse.

This haunted attraction consisted of three venues located throughout the town: the print museum, the fire station and a historic trail.

Those who worked at Haunted Palouse were all volunteers. They filled a variety of roles such as selling or collecting tickets, selling treats or dressing up in costume and scaring attendees.

Pullman resident Eric Loz was a Roamer. His job was to frighten people while they waited in line for one of the haunted houses.

“I was told by a lot of people and from other scarers that I had the best costume and was doing the best job,” Loz said.

This was Loz’s second year volunteering for Haunted Palouse, and he has enjoyed the experience for both years, he said.

“As a Roamer, I didn’t get to interact as much with the other volunteers, but they all were nice and it was a great community,” Loz said.

Loz wore a homemade zombie costume for Haunted Palouse on Saturday, Oct. 19.

“It was a mask,” he said. “I wore a ghillie suit and then I put a little bit of makeup on the mask and on my neck.”

Loz suggested that those who tend to be more nervous around haunted houses still go to Haunted Palouse, but with a group.

“You don’t want to go alone, or you’ll get too scared,” he said.

In the case of the haunted house located at the Newspaper & Printing Museum in Palouse, Haunted Palouse Co-Chair Janet Barstow, dressed as the Grim Reaper, puts groups of four of five together if people came in smaller groups.

“It’s easier to separate them that way,” she said.

The haunted house in the print museum began in complete darkness. The walls moved closer and closer while attendees struggled to move forward.

Following rooms included a maze where people had to choose the correct door to keep moving along, fake spiders and the faces of volunteers popping out and other volunteers in costume separating one person from the rest of their group.

Each room had details that fit the theme. These themes included an evil mermaid’s tank, a room of evil dolls and a room of flashing lights with a volunteer in costume walking toward a group.

Once attendees left each of the haunted houses, many went to the stand outside the print museum for cookies, hot chocolate and apple cider, all sold at $1 each. Others chose to visit the on-site fortune teller or go to one of the local bars in Palouse.