The Daily Evergreen

Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

Identifying threads of commonality can lead to more appreciation

Jaime+Nolan%2C+associate+vice+president+for+community%2C+equity+and+inclusive+excellence%2C+examines+how+to+understand+people+with+differing+backgrounds+Tuesday.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

Jaime Nolan, associate vice president for community, equity and inclusive excellence, examines how to understand people with differing backgrounds Tuesday.

Jaime Nolan, associate vice president for community, equity and inclusive excellence, examines how to understand people with differing backgrounds Tuesday.

STEPHEN MURNANE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Jaime Nolan, associate vice president for community, equity and inclusive excellence, examines how to understand people with differing backgrounds Tuesday.

STEPHEN MURNANE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

STEPHEN MURNANE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Jaime Nolan, associate vice president for community, equity and inclusive excellence, examines how to understand people with differing backgrounds Tuesday.

KURIA POUNDS, Evergreen reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Jaime Nolan, associate vice president for community, equity and inclusive excellence, led a Building Coalitions Across Divides workshop to facilitate discussions about mutuality and sharing commonalities between people of opposing beliefs and contrasting opinions.

Nolan said she worked on coalition-building for 25 years and has participated in not only her own training, but also similar training in an international level to build coalitions like this.

“[By] being able to identify threads of commonality and [building] coalitions through some mutual self-interest,” she said, “we can appreciate more and more of the differences.”

During the workshop, there was a partner activity that involved one person who would ask personal questions and another would answer. The person who asked the question was not allowed to interject at any point and had to listen to every word the other person said.

Nolan said the point of this activity was to make sure people were actually listening because people can find unique commonalities if they actually listen.

“It’s in that moment of vulnerability, that anything can happen because I am connecting with you,” she said.

Tara Johnson, health promotion specialist at Cougar Health Services, said the main reason she came to this event is that her work is on building coalitions, as well as preventing campus sexual violence.

“Both of those projects require that we build coalitions and that we really take the bulk of campus into account,” Johnson said.

She said it is important for her to get a sense of how to engage with certain topics so she can reach out to more people who need assistance.

“Building some knowledge and skill around engaging with folks with different political ideologies than myself and different values than myself is something I want to get out of this workshop,” Johnson said.

Nolan said discussions on controversial topics with a yes or no answer jostles people and makes them feel uncomfortable at first because people are nervous to hear the other side. By listening, giving feedback and then responding, it will help build coalitions, she said.

“We learn when we get jostled, so this jostles people from the get-go,” she said.

Nolan said even though misunderstandings happen, clarifications could lead to coalitions being built and lessen the chances of having misconceptions.

“If I say in that place that, ‘I really want to understand you,’ ” she said, “then anything could happen.”

About the Writer
KURIA POUNDS, Evergreen reporter

Kuria is a freshman broadcast news major from Bellevue, Washington.

Leave a Comment

Social Media Policy

The Office of Student Media

The purpose of the comment section is to foster courteous and constructive discussion of relevant issues. The Daily Evergreen staff reserve the right to delete any comment we deem at odds with that mission.

We want to establish a fair and open forum for discussion, but personal attacks and threats of any kind actively take away from that purpose. Once we delete a comment we will explain both in the post and through a personal message to the sender as to why it didn’t meet our standards. We will also add a link to our social media policy page on our website. We cannot allow comments that could possibly keep others from speaking their mind on our page.

Prohibited comments include:

  • Comments with directed profanity, bullying, spam, false or misleading statements
  • Comments that could cause physical and emotional harm to any person
  • Offensive language targeted toward a specific group of people
  • Comments that are off-topic
  • Comments that are racist, sexist or bigoted
  • Comments by students working for The Office of Student Media, unless authorized





Navigate Left
  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    Local

    Kamiak Elementary holds family night

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    Ryan Leaf addiction after NFL career

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    Environmental groups to host biennial sustainability fair

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    Business college to have new program requirements

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    State Route 26 detour in effect

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    Crime

    Pullman man faces four felony charges

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    Local

    Annual Plant Science Day to have hands-on experiments

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    Local

    Pullman plans to make some parks more accessible

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    Speaker addresses importance of physical activity

  • Associate vice president engages in coalition-building

    News

    Students build inflatable for children

Navigate Right

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Every student. Every story. Every day.
Associate vice president engages in coalition-building