Co-op board of directors to settle on Pullman location

To encourage healthy eating, store will offer nutrition planning

Co-op+board+member+Sue+Guyett+said+a+new+store+in+Pullman+will+have+a+positive+impact+on+the+community%2C+because+36+cents+of+every+dollar+will+go+back+into+it.
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Co-op board of directors to settle on Pullman location

Co-op board member Sue Guyett said a new store in Pullman will have a positive impact on the community, because 36 cents of every dollar will go back into it.

Co-op board member Sue Guyett said a new store in Pullman will have a positive impact on the community, because 36 cents of every dollar will go back into it.

COURTESY OF SUE GUYETT

Co-op board member Sue Guyett said a new store in Pullman will have a positive impact on the community, because 36 cents of every dollar will go back into it.

COURTESY OF SUE GUYETT

COURTESY OF SUE GUYETT

Co-op board member Sue Guyett said a new store in Pullman will have a positive impact on the community, because 36 cents of every dollar will go back into it.

ALEX CATANZARO, Evergreen reporter

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The Pullman Good Food Co-op board of directors is narrowing down sites for a new grocery store in Pullman.

Sue Guyett, co-op board member, said the board of directors has been working with several property owners to find a location.

“The full-service grocery store will provide the community with equitable access to healthy, affordable, quality food,” Guyett said.

She said they are looking for locations that would offer customers good parking and adequate square footage with expansion opportunities. They want a location that’s convenient for customers to get to.

The new full-service grocery store is looking to have a positive impact on the local community. Guyett said that member owned food co-ops like these benefit the community.

Joseph Melior, front end manager at the Moscow Food Co-op, said the Moscow Food Co-op affects the local community, noting the Dime in Time program.

Each time a customer brings in a reusable bag or drinking cup, they are given a 10-cent token and can choose from one of the three charities it will go to.

Guyett said that on average for every dollar spent in a food co-op, 36 cents go back into the community. Purchases in chain stores only give 23 cents back into the community.

The board of directors hope to offer nutrition classes, meal planning, shopping on a budget and cooking classes to the public. Guyett said the co-op board of directors plan to provide healthy prepared foods to help members of the community make healthier eating decisions.

She said they also have plans for other activities once the store opens.

Guyett said they expect the co-op to have a positive impact on the local economy.

The Moscow Food Co-op employs 170 locals, Meilor said.

Guyett said some residents have to travel to purchase some food and the Pullman Good Food Co-op will provide them an opportunity to shop local and expand food options available to Pullman residents.