Café Moro baristas are adored by their ‘crushtomers’

LATISHA JENSEN | Evergreen reporter

Tyson Feasel, the owner of Café Moro since 2011 spends most days mastering his coffee skills and getting to know customers.

“Everyone gets along, I think it’s pretty relaxed,” Feasel said. “It’s nice to have all these people where you’re kind of part of their lives and part of their routine.”

Since the shop’s remodel in October, the coffee-making process has sped up and customers do not have to wait as long in line, Feasel said.

“It’s been really nice because the espresso machines do a whole lot more than our old ones,” he said. “I think the biggest improvement has been in work flow. It feels a little more streamlined.”

He enjoys how every day is a similar routine but it is also slightly different, which keeps things consistent yet interesting, Feasel said.

“It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “You’re always trying to [make coffee] a little better or make a better heart or a better rosette and get that latte art to be perfect.”

Sometimes, Feasel said, when a barista pours too many latte art hearts, someone reads deeper into the heart than the barista intended. He refers to this person as a ‘crushtomer.’

“I warn all my employees,” Feasel said, “you can pour a heart but a leaf is always the safest.”

Although Feasel doesn’t often make it out of Café Moro to experience other coffee shops, what he believes makes his shop stand out from the rest is the dark colors in the rooms, making it feel calm and comfortable, and on average it is a little quieter, he said.

Café Moro opened in the late 1990s and, as Pullman is a small town, Feasel serves multiple regulars who started coming to Moro even before he was the owner.

He has master’s theses and other documents collected from students who probably utilized his college-budget-friendly $3 bottomless drip coffee more times than they can count.

“The hardest part about Pullman is you get to know people who don’t stay forever,” Feasel said, “but they come back for football games or just to visit.”

Feasel loves his job and loves interacting with the community while making them their favorite drinks.

“It’s not something I thought I would do for the rest of my life, but now I can’t imagine doing anything else,” Feasel said. “Coffee is awesome and I think eventually there’s more I want do here, but I feel like I’ve won.”